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Razer Mamba TE vs Naga Epic Chroma

I recently got back into PC gaming on Windows, which means I have been playing Battlefield 3 and 4 again since those games wouldn’t run on my iMac natively. This is a not a Windows vs. OS X post but I just wanted to mention that on my iMac I was more or less limited to Diablo 3 and StarCraft II as far as what games I enjoy playing. For those two games the Naga Epic Chroma worked wonderfully, matter of fact I am still using the Naga Epic Chroma on my iMac as I type this. I was also using the Naga Epic on my gaming PC for the last week but I realized that I didn’t like it as much for fast-paced FPS games like Battlefield and Team Fortress 2, among others. I know the Naga Epic is marketed for MMORPG style games and for those style games I would highly recommend it. For FPS games I personally feel it is just has way too many buttons to be useful. I found myself constantly pressing the wrong hotkey button when gaming in intense situations where I needed speed to either switch to a secondary weapon, pull a knife, or throw a grenade, or whatever I needed to do. My reaction time felt slower as I was feeling for the correct button and continually would press the wrong hotkey button which resulted in an in-game death.

Razer - Mamba TE - Naga Epic Chroma


I knew I was going to buy another Razer mouse as I personally like Razer as a brand, I own two of their keyboards and now I own three of their gaming mice. I decided on the Razer Mamba TE for my PC gaming needs. The Mamba is a traditional gaming mouse with two hotkey buttons on the side, the scroll wheel which also doubles as a third hotkey button, then the obvious right-click and left-click buttons. The Mamba also has two more buttons on the top of the mouse that you can use to adjust the DPI (dots per inch) of the mouse. The Mamba has 16,000 DPI which is just under double of what the Naga Epic (8,200 DPI) offers. Of course you can map those two buttons or any of the buttons for that matter to perform other functions as you see fit. The two hotkey buttons on the Mamba just feel more natural as my thumb is placed over top hotkey button naturally. It is also much easier to tap the lower hotkey button as I can slide my thumb down to easily press the second button which makes a huge difference in fast paced FPS games.

The Mamba TE with the TE standing for Tournament Edition is a wired mouse. There is a non-TE version of the Mamba which is wireless but could also be used as a wired mouse if you wanted it to. The Naga Epic is similar to the non-TE Mamba mouse, in which it can be used either wirelessly or wired depending on your needs. I personally prefer a wired mouse for gaming because nothing sucks worse than having your mouse start to lose connectivity because of a dying battery! I will say that for most PC games I play that are either single-player or campaign style, like Fallout 4 or Witcher 3, not having a wire get in the way is nice! The Naga Epic comes with a nice charing dock that allows you to easily charge your mouse at night when you are not pulling all nighters in Skyrim or whatever game you play.

Let me talk about the lights on both mice. If I were to choose between the two mice based on which one had the better lighting effects then the Mamba would win this battle hands down. On the Mamba the Razer logo lights up, the sides of the mouse lights up, and the scroll wheel lights up. On the Naga Epic only the scroll wheel lights up and the hotkey number pad on the side lights up. When I adjust lights on both mice in the Razer Synapse app the Mamba just has more options to choose from.

Naga Epic Lighting Effects
Static
Spectrum Cycling
Off

Mamba Lighting Effects
Breathing
Reactive
Wave
Spectrum Cycling
Static
None

The Mamba also has the Chroma Configurator which I find hilarously funny since the Naga Epic is called the Naga Epic Chroma but can’t use the Chroma Configurator but the Mamba, not called Chroma, can use it. Anyhow the Chroma Configurator allows you to set-up the lighting effects on your mouse to completely customize your mouse lights to whatever fits your style. You can adjust seven different sections on each side (or strip) of the Mamba mouse as well as the logo and the scroll wheel effects. You can adjust things such as the speed, direction of the light flow, pattern, color, width, and effects layer. While you can customize the lights to whatever fits your individual style I personally feel the Mamba allows you to make it more personal because of the many more lighting options to choose from. Both look great lit up on top of your desk though so whichever mouse you choose will look fantastically colorful!

Mamba TE


One area where I feel the Naga Epic is better than the Mamba is in the weight department. The Mamba is super light in the hand, that isn’t a bad thing it is just I prefer a meatier mouse when gaming. The official weights for each are as follows:
  • Naga Epic - 150g
  • Mamba - 133g
While that doesn’t seem like much of a difference on paper, in the hand is another story. You can feel the lightness of the Mamba, it feels almost like I am only gliding my hand around on the top of my desk. This is all preference based, I am sure there are plenty of people who prefer a lighter mouse and most hardcore gamers probably do as well. My all-time favorite mouse was the Logitech G5, it was very light but it came with a weight system that allowed you to adjust the feel of the mouse. I loaded up the tiny tray on the bottom of the G5 mouse with all the weights it could hold, I sort of wished the Mamba had something similar. I haven’t noticed the lightness of the Mamba affecting my gameplay whatsoever, it is just something I notice when going from the Naga Epic to the Mamba.

Logitech G5
Other than the few items I outlined above the rest of the specs are on par with one another. The cable length of both mice is 7 feet long, both mice can be adjusted using the Razer Synapse software. Both mice work on either Windows or OS X, I assume any other OS as well although the Synapse software is not available for anything other than Windows or OS X. Both mice feel great in the hand, the curvature of the mouse feels very comfortable and my hands never feel sore after extended usage. There are over 16 million color combos for both mice, while the Mamba has more lighting options but both mice support the same color spectrum. I think the Mamba is a tad shorter in terms of height, the Mamba also feels longer in the hand. The Naga Epic feels more stocky

Nage Epic Chroma


Both mice are excellent products and I would have zero problem recommending either of them. Matter of fact I highly recommend both mice, depending on your needs I don’t think you can go wrong with either device. If you look at the customer ratings in places like Best Buy, Amazon, and eBay you will see that both have great ratings with very few negative comments. If you are looking for a gaming mouse to play a wide variety of games such as MMO, RPG, FPS, etc., then I would recommend the Naga Epic as I feel it is the better choice if you play different genre of PC games. If you are strictly FPS or even third-person action games then the Mamba would be my recommendation. If you are not a gamer but just want a mouse that is colorful and looks great on the desk then I would also recommend the Mamba.

Mamba Specs
* 16,000 DPI 5G laser sensor
* Up to 210 inches per second / 50 G acceleration
* 1,000 Hz Ultrapolling / 1 ms response time
* On-The-Fly Sensitivity Adjustment
* Ergonomic right-handed design with textured rubber side grips
* Chroma lighting with true 16.8 million customizable color options
* Inter-device color synchronization
* Nine independently programmable buttons with tilt-click scroll wheel
* Razer Synapse enabled
* 2.1 m / 7 ft braided fiber USB cable
* Approximate size: 128 mm / 5 in (Length) x 70 mm / 2.76 in (Width) x 42.5 mm / 1.67 in (Height)
* Approximate weight: 133 g / 0.29 lbs (with cable)


Nage Epic Chroma Specs
* 19 MMO optimized programmable buttons
* 12-button mechanical thumb grid
* Tilt-click scroll wheel
* 8200dpi 4G laser sensor
* Wireless gaming-grade technology
* Charging dock
* Chroma lighting with 16.8 million customizable color options
* Razer Synapse enabled
* 1000Hz Ultrapolling
* Up to 200 inches per second/50g acceleration
* Zero-acoustic Ultraslick mouse feet
* 7 foot/2.1m braided fiber USB charging cable
* Approximate size:
* Length: 119mm/4.68”
* Width: 75mm/2.95”
* Height: 43mm/1.69”
* Approximate weight: 150g/0.33lbs
* Battery life: Approximately 20hrs (continuous gaming)
* The life expectancy of this battery depends upon its usage

You can buy both Razer mice on Amazon;
Mamba TE - http://amzn.to/1QoyLpt
Naga Epic Choma - http://amzn.to/1Vq8H1C

More info;
Mamba TE - http://www.razerzone.com/gaming-mice/razer-mamba-tournament-edition
Naga Epic Chroma - http://www.razerzone.com/gaming-mice/razer-naga-epic-chroma

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